New Aztec history facts

Oct 04, 2022

Remains of Aztec dwelling and floating gardens unearthed in Mexico City

[Live Science] Archaeologists have uncovered the ruins of a dwelling that was built up to 800 years ago during the Aztec Empire in the Centro neighborhood of Mexico City, Mexico, during works to modernize the area...

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Sep 21, 2022

Archaeologists uncover post-conquest Aztec altar in Mexico City

[Reuters] Sometime after Hernan Cortes conquered the Aztec capital of Tenochtitlan in modern-day Mexico City in 1521, an indigenous household that survived the bloody Spanish invasion arranged an altar including incense and a pot with human ashes...

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Sep 16, 2022

New comic book chronicles the fall of the Aztec Empire

[Yucatán Magazine] A new line of comics titled “Aztec Empire” brings to the page in stunning color an account of the fall of this great civilization...

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Feb 12, 2022

Maya and Aztec Chocolate History and Antecedents

[Electrum Magazine] Chocolate is perhaps one of the most intriguing foods in history, prized for thousands of years and now a global passion. Possibly originating in the understory Amazon rain forest, the small tree sought out by monkeys and other animals has produced a substance that has become a staple of civilization worldwide. Ethnobotanists since Linnaeus  – obviously an enthusiast – identify this plant as Theobroma cacao, “food of the gods” and the product is otherwise known as chocolate; even this word causes a psychological craving among chocoholics much as cacao has for at least 4,000 years...

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Jan 03, 2022

Top 7 Unique Activities in Mexico City

[Travel Off Path] Mexico City is the main political, economic, cultural, and educational center in the country. It has experienced hundreds of historical events and is a tourist destination visited by travelers worldwide...

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Dec 14, 2021

How the Aztec Empire Was Forged Through a Triple Alliance

[History] The Aztec Empire was a shifting and fragile alliance of three principle city-states. The largest and most powerful among the three was Tenochtitlán, the island city built by the Mexica people, also known as the Aztecs. The Aztec Triple Alliance exerted tremendous power over a wide swath of central Mexico for just shy of 100 years (1420s to 1521) before falling to Spanish conquistadors led by Hernán Cortés...

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Nov 19, 2021

The Aztecs: Lost Civilizations

A new book representing a lifetime of research. In The Aztecs, Frances F. Berdan connects history with the Aztec culture which still survives - and you'll learn that tepozmecaixtlatiltlahcuilloli is the word for email in Nahautl...

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Oct 25, 2021

Archaeologists Unearth 600-Year-Old Golden Eagle Sculpture at Aztec Temple

[Smithsonian Magazine] The eagle—carved out of tezontle, a reddish volcanic rock commonly used in both pre-Hispanic and modern Mexico—measures 41.7 by 27.6 inches, making it the largest bas-relief (or low relief) work found at the pyramid-shaped temple to date...

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Sep 29, 2021

How the Aztec Empire Was Forged Through a Triple Alliance

[History] The Aztec Empire was a shifting and fragile alliance of three principle city-states. The largest and most powerful among the three was Tenochtitlán, the island city built by the Mexica people, also known as the Aztecs. The Aztec Triple Alliance exerted tremendous power over a wide swath of central Mexico for just shy of 100 years (1420s to 1521) before falling to Spanish conquistadors led by Hernán Cortés...

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Aug 23, 2021

Flowers and songs: Aztec poetry

[The Sopris Sun] The Aztecs had a long literary tradition, with poetic works long before England had its Shakespeare or Spain its Cervantes. From the little that was saved from the destruction, we know of poets like Tlaltecatzin, Cuacuauhtzin, Nezahualpilli, Cacamatzin, and Nezahualcóyotl...

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Jul 14, 2021

What can the Aztecs tell us about themselves? The secrets of their ‘indigenous annals’

[History Extra] Views of the indigenous people of central Mexico have long been shaped by accounts written by Spanish invaders and colonial settlers – but, as Camilla Townsend explains, if we focus instead on the Aztecs’ own records, a very different picture emerges...

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Jun 03, 2021

Mexico raids building project next to Teotihuacán pyramids

[Associated Press] Mexico sent in 250 National Guard troops and 60 police officers Monday to seize land next to the pre-Hispanic ruins of Teotihuacán where authorities have said bulldozers were destroying outlying parts of the archeological site...

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Apr 12, 2021

Zaachila Ruins

[Atlas Oscura] You can explore the halls of tombs in the abandoned former capital of the Zapotecs...

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Mar 14, 2021

Bunnies helped a great civilisation in ancient Mexico thrive

[NewScientist] The trade in bunnies helped power an ancient economy. Teotihuacan, an ancient city in central Mexico, was an advanced metropolis where most people lived in apartment complexes. The city reached its peak between the first century and 550 AD. With about 100,000 residents, it was the largest urban area in the Americas at the time, of a similar scale and sophistication as other ancient centres like Alexandria and Rome...

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Feb 18, 2021

Mexico is Hiding The World’s Largest Pyramid

[Daily Beast] In the city of Cholula in central Mexico there stands a hill with a giant church on top which hides a manmade pyramid filled with secrets...

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Jan 19, 2021

Archeologists discover ancient Mayan palace in eastern Mexico

MEXICO CITY (Reuters) - Archeologists have discovered a large palace likely used by the Mayan elite more than 1,000 years ago in the ancient city of Kuluba, near the modern day tourist hot spot of Cancun in eastern Mexico, Mexican anthropology officials said...

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Dec 10, 2020

Aztec ballgame returns to Mexico City after 500 years

[AFP] Five centuries ago, newly arrived in what is now Mexico, the Spanish conquistadors banned an indigenous game involving a heavy ball, circular stone goals and human sacrifice.

Now, a group of young players are bringing the game back to life for the first time in Mexico City -- without the human sacrifice -- at the site of an old garbage dump.

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Nov 24, 2020

Temple of Santiago Tlatelolco's Stones

[Atlas Obscura] Take a close look at the stones of the Temple of Santiago Tlatelolco, and you’ll notice they reveal episodes from Mexico’s past. The 16th-century church was constructed with material from the destroyed pyramids of Tlatelolco. The pilfered stones were not randomly placed...

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Oct 20, 2020

Ancient Aztec Temazcal uncovered by archaeologists in Mexico City’s La Merced

[Yucatan Times] An ancient Native Aztec sauna, dating back to the 14th Century, has been uncovered by archaeologists in Mexico City.

Central components of the sweat lodge where the tub or steam bath pool was located are still intact, according to Mexico’s National Institute of Anthropology and History...

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Sep 16, 2020

Ancient Maya kingdom unearthed in a backyard in Mexico

Really? "Associate professor of anthropology Charles Golden and his colleagues have found the long-lost capital of an ancient Maya kingdom in the backyard of a Mexican cattle rancher." by Lawrence Goodman, Brandeis University

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Aug 22, 2020

More on Eduardo Williams' New Book...

As Mexico News Daily put it, this book is "a treasure chest full of wonderful places to visit". As a scholarly work it isn't cheap, but for those interested in Mexican history, it's a resource to check out!

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Aug 18, 2020

Archaeologist casts new light on ancient people of western Mexico

[Mexico News Daily] A new book — written in excellent English — presents the first study of the archaeology of the whole of western Mexico, from the earliest to the latest cultural periods, by a single author.

It is also unique in that it is far more than a simple compendium of excavations and artifacts. Guadalajara-born archaeologist Eduardo Williams, who is now a professor at the Colegio de Michocán, tells us this up front in the book’s title: Ancient West Mexico in the Mesoamerican Ecumene...

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Jul 20, 2020

Copal: The incense of ancient Mexico

[Desert Sun] The Aztecs called it the blood of trees, the exuding resin of a species taxonomists classified as Protium copal. Spanish friar Bernardino de Sahagun wrote that the Aztecs used tree gum mixed with calcium phosphate to glue gems to their teeth. But this gum, known as copal, was far more valuable than just a glue. This was the sacred incense of the Maya and Aztec civilizations — quantities of it discovered sequestered within the Great Temple at Tenochtitlan preserved as lumps and bars...

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Jun 09, 2020

Archeologists discover ancient Mayan palace in eastern Mexico

[Reuters] Archeologists have discovered a large palace likely used by the Mayan elite more than 1,000 years ago in the ancient city of Kuluba, near the modern day tourist hot spot of Cancun in eastern Mexico, Mexican anthropology officials said...

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May 15, 2020

Cave Full of Untouched Maya Artifacts Found at Chichén Itzá

[Smithsonian] It’s a stroke of luck that Pinto decided not to remove the artifacts from the cave all those years ago. The untouched state of the cave system gives researchers a chance to investigate how much cultural exchange took place between the Maya civilization and other Central American cultures, and perhaps learn more about the Maya before Chichén Itzá went into decline. Cutting edge 3-D mapping, paleobotany and other recent techniques will all aid in the research effort....

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Apr 09, 2020

Gold bar found beneath Mexico City street was part of Moctezuma's treasure

[National Post] A new scientific analysis of a large gold bar found decades ago in downtown Mexico City reveals it was part of the plunder Spanish conquerors tried to carry away as they fled the Aztec capital after native warriors forced a hasty retreat...

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Mar 23, 2020

Xalapa Museum of Anthropology

[Atlas Obscura] The fascinating anthropology museum in Xalapa houses a staggering collection of over 25,000 artifacts representing a diverse array of cultures, from the Aztec to the Huastec, Totonac, and Mayan civilizations. But the most significant exhibits are undoubtedly those from the enormous collection of artifacts belonging to the mother civilization of Mesoamerica, the Olmeca...

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Feb 20, 2020

Ancient Aztec records reveal hidden earthquake risk

[National Geographic] According to the Anales de Tlatelolco, the earth cracked open in central Mexico on February 19, 1575. The ancient codex, composed around the time the Aztec Empire fell to Spanish conquistadors, features a story of a convulsion that lasted for up to five days, creating landslides and opening up a nearly three-mile-long scar in the ground...

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Jan 28, 2020

Archaeologists Discover Two Anchors Dating to the Conquest of Mexico

[The Maritime Executive] Archaeologists from Mexico's National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) have discovered a set of two archaic anchors of the coast of Veracruz, and the artifacts' design dates from the era of conquistador Hernán Cortés. In the 16th century, the area was a busy trading hub for Spanish vessels, and they provide new context for the early Spanish presence in the region...

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Jan 13, 2020

Food fight: How a community in Mexico used food to resist the Aztec empire

[Vanderbilt University] As a bioarchaeologist, Alcantara studies how Tlaxcallan, an ancient city in Mexico, was able to resist the dominant power of the Aztec empire. Alcantara has discovered that food was key...

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